Sep 17, 2014

View →

fauxpup:

It’s amazing what some of those who are sworn to serve and protect will do to those they are responsible for when they don’t think cameras are watching.

(Source: sckrewedup, via our-bothersome)

View →

View →

nuclearvault:

Operation Crossroads, Shot Baker (1946)
NE Lagoon, Bikini Atoll
Underwater, yield 21 kilotons

(via homofuck)

View →

trukenvrac:

glyn smith

trukenvrac:

glyn smith

(via autumnslaughter)

View →


Sep 16, 2014

View →

limitsdestroyer:

plague by Prophetharm

View →

View →

limitsdestroyer:

Colorado Plains Art Test by DylanPierpont

View →


Sep 11, 2014

View →


Sep 8, 2014

america-wakiewakie:

Amazon Indian Warriors Beat and Strip Illegal Loggers in Battle for Jungle’s Future | Warrior Publications 

A group of warriors from Brazil’s indigenous Ka’apor tribe tracked down illegal loggers in the Amazon, tied them up, stripped them and beat them with sticks.

Photographer Lunae Parracho followed the Ka’apor warriors during their jungle expedition to search for and expel illegal loggers from the Alto Turiacu Indian territory in the Amazon basin.

Tired of what they say is a lack of sufficient government assistance in keeping loggers off their land, the Ka’apor people, who along with four other tribes are the legal inhabitants and caretakers of the territory, have sent their warriors out to expel all loggers they find and set up monitoring camps.

Last year, the Brazilian government said that annual destruction of its Amazon rain forest jumped by 28 percent after four straight years of decline. Based on satellite images, it estimated that 5,843 square kilometres of rain forest were felled in the one-year period ending July 2013.

The Amazon rain forest is considered one of the world’s most important natural defences against global warming because of its capacity to absorb huge amounts of carbon dioxide. Rain forest clearing is responsible for about 75 percent of Brazil’s emissions, as vegetation is burned and felled trees rot. Such activity releases an estimated 400 million tons of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere every year, making Brazil at least the sixth-biggest emitter of carbon dioxide gas.

(Photo Credit: Lunae Parracho/Reuters)

(via herbivorexvx)

View →

odditiesoflife:

World’s Largest Cave Passage

There’s a jungle inside Vietnam’s mammoth cavern. A skyscraper could fit too. Hang Son Doong, or “mountain river cave,” is in a remote part of central Vietnam. Hidden in rugged Phong Nha-Ke Bang National Park near the border with Laos, the cave is part of a network of 150 or so caves, many still not surveyed, in the Annamite Mountains. You can read the full story of the cave explorers expedition here.

(via humanfordinner)

View →

expressions-of-nature:

Claws of the Dragon / Senja, Norway by: Andrew

(via bonenecropolis)

View →


Sep 7, 2014

(Source: silent-musings)

View →

View →